IPL Round-up: Kochi on verge of going belly up, Kings XI ‘courts’ BCCI


Shashi Tharoor at the MEDEF Université d'été

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Is it the end of the road for the Kochi consortium? A Daily News & Analysis (DNA) report would have us believe so.

Vijay Tagore reports that at a meeting held on Friday, the 12th of November, 2010, the franchisee owners agreed to write to the Board Of Control For Cricket in India (BCCI) to cancel the team.The letter is to be submitted this Monday or Tuesday. This is a good two weeks before the deadline extended by the BCCI.

(Well, if there’s bad news to be had , you might as well receive it early.)

The irreconcilable differences in the cobbled-together-unit could not stand the scrutiny of day. The members’ sole concern is to recover the money and bank guarantee submitted to the Board.The agreement fee was $10 million (Rs. 45 crore) and the bank guarantee Rs. 153 crore , 10 per cent of the team’s worth.

In this case, it does seem a case of a terrible beginning making for an equally tragic ending.

The Indian Premier League (IPL) governing council meet this Wednesday, the 17th of November, 2010. The purpose of the meeting is to explore the feasibility of hosting a seven team tournament.Also invited to the meeting are state association representatives—the ones that will be staging the IPL games.

Kings XI Punjab have moved the Bombay High Court challenging their expulsion from the IPL. The Kings XI petition has termed the rustication “deliberate and calculated". It has also pleaded for a revocation of the termination of the contract saying that it hurts the interests of young cricketers from Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir.

It is also speculated that if the Kochi consortium—as expected— does not meet the BCCI deadline, Ahmedabad would be the beneficiary in a new auction, if and when held. It would make it third time lucky for the Gujarat port.

The Kochi consortium consists of mostly Gujarati businessmen who were converted to Kochi’s cause by the intervention of then External Affairs Minister, Shashi Tharoor.

New Zealand’s domestic cricketers may be the latest beneficiaries of the IPL franchisees’ munificence. Talent scouts are considering signing up ‘fringe’ cricketers before they hit the big time for their outfits. Australia and West Indies have already benefited from having their upcoming stars play in the IPL. Central Districts all-rounder Doug Bracewell – the 20-year-old son of former Black Cap Brendon – and Auckland’s Zimbabwean-born big-hitter Colin de Grandhomme are among those short-listed.

Quote of the day:
Human beings are perhaps never more frightening than when they are convinced beyond doubt that they are right. – Laurens Van der Post

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