A Comeback Lesson In Serve And Volley


JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA  - SEPTEMBER 20:  Somdev Devvarman of India celebrates his win during their Davis Cup match between South Africa and India at the Ellis Park Indoor Arena in Johannesburg on 20, September 2009 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Lee Warren/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Aided by the sultry Chennai weather, the Indian Davis Cup team scripted a famous come-from-behind victory at Chennai, outplaying Brazil in both the singles matches on Sunday, the 19th of September, 2010.

This time though, the victory was achieved in a thoroughly professional manner with the entire team carrying its weight.

 Rohan Bopanna and Somdev Devvarman had their say. They have reassured Indian tennis fans that the country’s Davis Cup hopes are in secure hands for the foreseeable future.

Bellucci caved in to cramps and dehydration in the morning after just a set and a half. Somdev Devvarman was left feeling a little bemused but why look a gift horse in the mouth?

Next, it was the turn of Bopanna to teach his Brazilian opponent, Ricardo Mello a serve and volley lesson not to be forgotten easily. The Coorgi cantered home in three straight sets and India find themselves in the World Group once more.

Leander Paes did the honours and hoisted the Boom Boomer on his shoulders during the victory lap around the tennis stadium.

On Saturday, the Indian Express doubles pair of Lee and Hesh ensured that India would have a fighting chance come Sunday. The weather played its part.

It helped that both the Brazilians were kept on court for the best part of four hours on Friday by their opponents.

This is Paes’ twenty first year playing the team format. It is an anniversary gift to cherish.

For Brazil, it was heartbreak after going 2-0 up on Friday, battling the odds and the unfamiliar conditions.

But full credit to this young Indian team. The fighting spirit of Paes seems to have rubbed off.

India are currently ranked 14 in Davis Cup, punching much above their weight. Rankings don’t mean a thing when it comes to playing for one’s country, at least in Davis Cup.

For the think tank, this is a vindication of their decision to play the tie on hard courts.

Most of India’s victories at home have come on grass courts.

Another glorious chapter in the chronicles of Indian sport. And that man Leander Paes had a hand to play.

Quote of the day:
Progress isn’t made by early risers. It’s made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something. – Robert Heinlein

 

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