Ten Knowledge Areas Went Out to Dine…One Got Ignored and Then There Were Nine «Papercut Edge


Change control. Project managers everywhere know the term. When a stakeholder requests a change to project work (scope), the impacts of that change need to be formally assessed. If the change will result in more time or money, the project manager needs to inform all stakeholders of the changes, and get their approval before the change can proceed. It’s the proper way to contain the project “iron triangle”.Many project managers I know would rather commit seppuku before they’d allow a stakeholder to make a change without following proper change control procedures. But are there circumstances where rigidly adhering to process could hurt the project?Project Management Knowledge AreasAccording to the PMBOK, these nine areas cover the gamut of knowledge required to manage a project.(Image courtesy of Viva IT)To many, project management process is immutable. The rules of PM are clear, and there are no exceptions. When I think back over my career, though, I can think of many times where breaking the process was the right thing to do. In almost all cases, I was making a concession for a stakeholder, and eating the cost. Surely the PMI must cover this–from my perspective, no process is immutable, and sometimes breaking the rules is completely appropriate.

Ten Knowledge Areas Went Out to Dine…One Got Ignored and Then There Were Nine «Papercut Edge

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